Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Dust

Sermon on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-21
For Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Elmwood Park, WI
February 18, 2015 (Ash Wednesday)

“Remember, O man, that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”  This paraphrase of Genesis 3:19 is what is said when ashes are placed on Christians’ foreheads in many churches on Ash Wednesday.  While we at Holy Cross haven’t been practicing the imposition of ashes, the verse which accompanies it is worth keeping in mind.  God made Adam from the dust of the ground, and when we who came from him die we will eventually become dust again.  Life lived only for the sake of this world is simply futile.  Vanity, says St. Solomon.  Nothing that is done in this world will last.  We will die, and what we have built for ourselves will belong to someone else, who will eventually die and again it will become someone else’s.  And on Judgment Day, everything in this old creation that hasn’t already fallen down, been blown up, or washed away will be destroyed with fervent heat, as atoms and molecules and even smaller particles come undone at the command of their creator.

Humanity doesn’t want to be dust.  Humanity doesn’t want its works and its ways to become nothing.  Humanity wants to become its own god.  That, after all, was what the serpent in the garden whispered to us: “You shall be like God.”  We want to be admired.  We want to be worshiped.  We want to be remembered.  We want to impress.  But our Creator is, by definition, greater than anything we can come up with.  And so our desire to be worshiped convinces us to ignore Him and deny His very existence, as the very idea of an infinitely intelligent and infinitely powerful being stands in the way of humanity’s desire to become lord and master of all.

How ironic, then, that the way our rejected Creator solves the problem is not by boasting, not by demonstrating His mighty power (although He can and does do that simply by reminding us that nature itself isn’t under our control in the form of hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, wildfires and the like), but in becoming one of us.  He who created the dust itself was made man, made from dust.  He who breathed life into the first man suffers death at the hands of His fellow men.  The real Lord and Master of all doesn’t need to boast of His status and His greatness, and so it’s no problem for Him to become one of us, live a humble life, and die a painful and undeserved death.  He who built it all lived not for his own greatness but for the love of His fellow men.  He went down with the creation He made into the grave, so that He could rebuild it in His own resurrection.  And His greatest glory is found in this, that He did it not to brag or boast of His power, but for the love of His bride the Church.

Laying up treasures on earth is not only against Jesus’ command in today’s Gospel.  It’s also futile.  You are dust, and shall return to the dust.  Laying up treasure in heaven, however, doesn’t mean trying to impress people by being “spiritual,” either.  Things done for supposedly religious reasons in this world will also turn to dust.  It’s not just monuments like the Tower of Babel raised in defiance or rejection of the Creator, but also houses of worship which have turned to dust over the millennia.  Certainly it is good to praise God, to worship Him, and to confess Him before our friends and neighbors, but even that can be done for the wrong reasons.  Phariseeism is in all of our hearts, and it’ll be there until we do, in fact, return to the dust we came from.

Rather, laying up treasure in heaven means regarding as valuable and important those things which give us heaven.  Our true treasures are not those things we do, whether we do them for ourselves or even supposedly for God, but those things our Creator has given us that bring us into the new creation.  Our watery grave in which we died with Christ only to be resurrected with Him by water connected with and comprehended in God’s Word.  The speaking of our Creator, which comes true even if it had not already been true, which declares you citizens of the new heavens and the new earth, forgiven, restored to God’s fellowship, and perfect.  And the body and blood of our crucified and risen God Himself, the first-fruits of the new creation which will not turn to dust, rust, or be stolen.  These are your true treasures, the things God gives you that have Himself, His Father, and the Holy Spirit hidden within, and therefore grant eternity with Him.  Amen.

+ Soli Deo Gloria +

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